Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Summer Review with Virginia Tech's School of Architecture + Design

Hello everyone,

Whether you are still in denial (which I am by the way) or you have come to the realization that summer is coming to an end and it's that time of year again...Back To School. It was only fitting for me to showcase what the students of Virginia Tech's School of Architecture + Design have created with the felt we donated to the Interior Design Program earlier on in the year. Because learning and being creative never stops!



Students participated in the Felt Construction: Pop Up Felt exhibit lead by Associate Professor, Helene Renard in April at Prospective Gallery. The students were divided into four groups and were left to their own devices to design and create a prototype for creating private spaces in a public environment. Below is the process some students had to go through from start to finish.



Looking up in your school lounge area never looked so wonderful! We start with the "Membrane" or "Light Filter". These students' designed a tapestry for the ceiling that not only adds a sense of beauty to the space but also softens and personalizes the environment. The Membrane is a transformative structure meant to change over time with the exposure to light and gravity over time. Created with our F50 Felt, dyed using tumeric, the students created the Membrane using "net-like construction" that can have an impact on and be impacted by the environment. Here's a look at what happened during the process of creating this beautiful felt piece.



With the trend of more and more spaces being open concept, this group of designers have come up with two different ways to easily make an open space private. "Tubicle" is a flexible partition that can be used to add privacy to a larger space like a social area or on a table for a single person trying to study. The Tubicle uses our Industrial Felt and Apple Green Designer Felt to help you create your own sanctuary in a noisy space like a university lounge. The acoustic properties of the wool felt not only create a physical partition but also help to dampen sound in the space.



See the world from a different perspective with the Canüdle. This floor based lounge chair created by the third group is quite unique. Similar to the versatility seen in the Tubicle above, this lounge chair is a flexible structure that can adapt to the users needs. Lay the structure flat out for lounging or roll it up to create a bench for sitting. The Canüdle can be adapted and hold its shape due to it's tubular design. These students used our Industrial Felt to create the Canüdle. Below is a behind-the-scenes look of the process to create the finished project.



This lounge chair is also great for a mini nap between classes! Maybe use it with the felt dividers from the second group and you've got your own private napping quarters.
 

The fourth group of designers explored how the properties of felt can affect the private space with "The Wooly Pad". Using Industrial Felt, the designers aimed to create a low seating enclosure, for those students seeking an isolated space in an open environment. The pod-like structure reminded me of felt artist, Freyja Sewell's, Hush project. A one-person private enclosure that helps to eliminate sound and smells (and light for a well-deserved nap!) due to the nature of the natural wool felt. Using the density of the felt itself, this group of designers were able to work with and enhance the structure and form of felt.



Below is the process the group went through.